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Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
which nobody would have ever predicted would end slavery 100 years later. the civil rights movement sought ups and downs. i think that it is important to always know that social movements are not simple narrative of parks of one of success after another. -- arcs of success after another. it is not about occupying space. it is about confronting the enormous challenges we face in america and the globe. if we do not confront of these changes, we will not have a future. one way of thinking about maybe the history of the abs and a flows of social movement is to say -- for those who write the demise of this movement, which there is is always a gap or you can have hope. that is the importance of the beginning of the occupy movement. it actually is a source of hope that people responded to the changes in this country that really show that there are cracks that can be exploited. and i will stop. thank you. >> ok. >> she actually took my answer. [laughter] that's what i was going to say. so, there is some good overlap. i guess i will talk a bit about my experience with occupy and start off wi
various views with legal and justice organizations. civil rights organizations, participation in national service organizations from one club to the rotary club. youth groups, campus groups, peace groups. gun safety advocates from the brady group to the major gun safety organizations. the educators that are groping for answers, the mental health community including the american academy that we have been through, it is not an extensive study. but the literature that the staff has been working. much of what we already had, trying to devour. the most interesting meeting is with an interfaith group. not only the traditional mainstream protestant churches, the catholic council of bishops, but evangelicals. they are reluctant to engage in is because it is may be an attack on a cultural thing related to gun ownership and the like. all these groups with the muslim community, the hindu community, etc.. it was really a fascinating discussion. and then we matt with sportsmen groups that is distinct from but do not disagree with the gun owner groups. they have a different perspective that includes th
the effort was an attack on law-abiding americans. >> i'm amazed at -- as was true in the civil rights struggle in the '60s, how much deception, how much deliberate misstatement of reality is taking place in this debate. >> president clinton campaigned tirelessly for the crime bill and often surrounded by police officers who argued they were being outgunned by criminals. the white house added funds to build prisons and put more cops on the streets and ordered to draw more republican votes. even so it was political tightrope. and democrats knew it. though the ban barely survived contentious vote in the house. ultimately passing by just a two-vote martin. 216-the 214. one of the narrowist legislative victories in history. once attached to the larger crime bill the whole thing went back to congress in the fall of '1994. in his book "my life," former president clinton remembered a direct appeal from democrats. just before the house vote on the crime bill, speaker tom foley and majority leader dick gephardt made a last-ditch appeal to remove the assault weapons ban from the bill. they said
pleased to announce that our administration has now restored the civil rights of more virginians than any other administration in the history of virginia. [applause] here is the plan. here in virginia, in the cradle of democracy, we enact policies that actually work. in washington, we see debt, taxes, delays, blank, and this function. function.\and dys but here in virginia, we see results, solutions, job growth, surpluses, and cooperation. what a difference 90 miles can make. [applause] virginia is ranked as america's most livable state and the best state in which to make a living. i think you will know that every other major national business publications puts virginia in the top three best states in which to do business. while that is all good, there are many areas where i believe we must play a much stronger foundation for the future of our commonwealth. this session, i am asking you to work with me to get a few big things done that i believe will create more jobs and more opportunities for our people. when you leave here on time, in 45 days, i want to be able to report to our citizens
members in the previous comment. an update on nelson mandela's health. the 94-year-old civil rights icon doing a little bit better. straight ahead -- >> what's going to dominate washington for the next threements here is going to be spending and debt. >> senator mitch mcconnell doesn't think gun control gets any movement in congress any time soon, but the white house may have something up its sleeve. we've learned a little bit more about what it's planning. we'll tell you about it and some rare unpublished color photos of the beatles first u.s. tour have been recovered. they are up for sale as well. you can probably get a really good deal on them. we'll give you a preview. this is msnbc, the place for politics and beatles stuff as well on sunday afternoons. . >>> here's a quick look at stories making news right now. doctors say former south african president nelson mandela is recovering well after being hospitalized for a lung infection and surgery to remove galstones and hockey fans, good news for you. the nhl announcing a tentative agreement for a new collective bargaining agreement wi
forward as well. >> this has been through the ages, active in the women's suffrage movement and civil rights movement. >> yes. >> from the beginning. >> yes, we are founded on january 13, 1913 at howard, and the first act of the founders was to participate in the suffrage march, in march of 1913. >> we're showing here prominent deltas through the years, as we mark this centennial event. >> so many who have been a part of our organization. they've gone on of course, of course, to do great things in their life. they started out with us. barbara jordan ran for financial secretary of the sorority before she became famous. >> right. moving forward here, what do you see as the main mission? you have this wonderful grassroots movement. >> right. >> with women who are dedicated to making our communities better, the community at large better. what do you see moving forward now? >> as we celebrate, because we're having a myriad of events this year. >> yeah. >> started with the float in the rose bowl parade, where we're not only celebrating history, but making history at the same time, by being
produce, it is a little murky. i'm not so sure whether you are concerned about the civil rights of the prisoners or the fact that guantanamo bay itself is something the u.s. should not keep open. -- listening to you, it is a little murky. so my question, is it closing guantanamo bay or giving justice to the people and the 186 people? when you go on that track, and everybody loses track of what is really the issue. >> i don't understand the distinction. it's not just to hold people indefinitely without. guantanamo is the symbol of that. you've got to get them out of there and close it. >> i don't want to get in an argument. >> your first point about the cost, not the economic cost that you can put a dollar figure on but the cost to america, the intangible cost. i think we saw that not long ago with the man extradited from the u.k. to america. i guess the u.k. is our closest allies in the war on terror and our closest ally made us promise that before they would extradite him we would not send them to guantanamo, that he would not be prosecuted in the military commission, which to
with on a number of issues, still many feel that gay rights like marriage equality is a civil rights issue. the "talk back" question for you today, should we welcome pastors in the public square despite their views on homosexuality. facebook.com/carolcnn, facebook.com/carolcnn. or tweet me at @carolcnn. i'll be right back. >>> good morning. thank you so much for being with us, i'm carol costello. time to check the top stories. >>> the federal government wants to give boeing's newest airline another look. the department of transportation will conduct a comprehensive review of the boeing 787 dreamlin dreamliner's critical systems including design, manufacturing, and assembly. the federal government says the aircraft are safe to fly. the 787 has had a pretty difficult week, though, incidents include a fire that started in the battery compartment of a japanese airliner and a fuel leak in another japan airlines jet. >>> afghan president hamid karzai arriving at the white house minutes ago for a one-on-one meeting with president obama. the future of u.s. troops in afghanistan topped the agenda.
into enforcement to the extent that a lot of advocates, particularly civil rights advocates, are actually very angry about it. it's never going to be perfect. i think that that's the place where the last comment that you read comes forward. we still have people who do constantly believe that a lot of them are criminals, drugging drugs or people. nobody wants that. so the question is, how much more needs to happen on the border and inside the united states before other kinds of reforms can happen? i believe that what the administration has been trying to say for the last two years is we've done that. look at the number of people we deported, something like 400,000 people, which is more than any president ever has in the last, you know, in all of history. the border is looking much better. i've been down, i've looked at it, it's looking better, but there are still problems. the question is, is it ok? that's going to be -- there's going to be competing versions of that no matter what happens. host: here are some of those numbers. on u.s. immigrant deportations, you can see the total so far during
of the civilized -- >> that's right. we spend more money on healthcare. >> bill: we obviously are not spending our money wisely. >> very efficiently. i think that's an accurate statement. yes, given the findings of this report. >> wow. >> bill: too much on medical arms race or maybe still call it? and not enough on prevention? >> well, certainly that may be part of it. the emphasis on prevention. we also have to think of how social policy, economic policy, other factors community development policies have implicationses for health. for example we have a society that's highly based on automobile transportation just to give you an example. thats a unintended implicationses for health. physical activity, for injuries. so i think one of the key things the committee found is we really need to look very broadly at a whole range of factors because this is such a systemic problem across multiple different conditions. not just a single or a couple factors. >> i think that's interesting because you think about the health. i think the overall issue is you've got the establishment of our healthcare system and
love hunters and love to hunt, this has nothing to do with protecting their rights to do just that. we have too many guns. people are dying. it's a civilized country. it's the worst example we can set for the world. i'm proud of my mayor, i'm so proud of joe biden. when he sits at the table, he means business. i think we're really on the right road and we've got to do something this time. >> connecticut's governor dan malloy is one of the elected leaders talking to vice president biden yesterday. let me play to you what he said this morning. >> he's got this down pretty well. he understands what we need to do to make it less likely that these things are going to happen in our -- in our cities and towns. and these mass murders could be limited, at least, going into the future, if some common sense things are taken -- the magazine thing is very big. >> the top two limit, magazines and closed-gun show loopholes. take us inside the hill here and take us inside the white house, shira, what are the chances this gets done? >> it's very doable. if there's ever a chance for congress to pass mea
what is realistic and what's not and that assault weapons ban is right there smack in the middle of everything. >> thanks very much, gloria. >>> more than half a million people are fleeing syria's civil war and now winter is compounding the misery for many refugees. >>> plus, details from this spectacular winter phenomena. impact life expectancy in the u.s., real estate in hong kong, and the optics industry in germany? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. with investment information, risks, fees and expenses excuse me, sir i'm gonna have to ask you to power down your little word game. i think your friends will understand. oh no, it's actually my geico app...see? ...i just uh paid my bill. did you really? from the plane? yeah, i can manage my policy, get roadside assistance,
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)